WW1  Pershore

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Remembering the Fallen ....... surnames M to P

Private Nicholas J MANN

Service No 9543


Age: 37


Worcestershire Regiment – 9th Battalion


Killed in action on 15th December 1916 at Mesopotamia, Turkey


Commemorated on the Basrah Memorial, Iraq.

Listed on Tewkesbury War Memorial, Pershore Abbey


Son of Clr. Serjt. Nicholas and Sarah Mann of Tewkesbury

Husband of Annie Mann of Newlands, Pershore


Evesham Journal 30th December 1916 – PERSHORE CASUALTIES


“Mrs Mann of the Newlands, Pershore received the sad news from the War Office on Boxing Day, the anniversary of her wedding day, that her husband Pte. Nicholas Joseph Mann had been killed in Mesopotamia. Pte. Mann belonged to the Worcesters and was 38 years of age. His wife had not seen him since just before he sailed for the Dardanelles, a year and six months ago. He was badly wounded in Gallipoli and was four months in hospital. Mrs Mann is left with three children. Pte. Mann’s younger Brother, Sergt. Victor Mann, was killed in France last August and another Brother, Lance-Corpl. Frank Mann, after being four times wounded is again back in the trenches. The Father, Nicholas George Augustus Mann is an Irishman and a good patriot. He lives at Tewkesbury and although 75 years of age, belongs to the V.T.C. It should be stated that Pte. Mann was a Volunteer in the South African War, for which he has medals and clasps, and he also volunteered in the early days of the present war. Prior to this he was an agent of the Pearl Insurance company at Pershore.”


Evesham Journal 6th January 1917 – TEWKESBURIANS KILLED


“Pte. Nicholas J Mann of the Warwicks. Was killed in action on 13th December. Deceased was the eldest son of Col. Sergtand Mrs Mann of Tewkesbury and leaves a widow and three small children who reside at Pershore to mourn his loss. He was one of the first batch of Tewkesbury Volunteers to serve in the South African War and was well known in Tewkesbury where he was for some years in the employ of Messrs. Haywood and Sons before removing to Pershore. This is the second son his parents have lost in this war”.


With acknowledgements and grateful thanks to Newquest Evesham Journal 

Gunner Charles MARSHALL


Service No 183338


Age: 21


Royal Field Artillery – “D” Bty. 306th Bde.


Died at Flanders, France on 7th May 1918 


Buried at Gonnehem British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France


Son of Charles & Ellen Marshall,  Newlands, Pershore


Evesham Journal, 1 June 1918:-- PERSHORE CASUALTIES. 


Each week sees additions made to the Pershore Roll of Honour, now a formidable list. Signaller C. Marshall R.F.A. eldest son of Pte. and Mrs. C. Marshall, of the Newlands, was killed in France on May 7. He was 21 years of age and unmarried. Before enlistment he resided with Mr. and Mrs. W. Guest, bakers of Rounds Green, Oldbury, by whom he was employed, and who held him, as their letters show, in great esteem. Every member of the Rounds Green staff have written in sympathy to the parents. Before working there, he was with Messrs. P.J. Prothero \& Co.\, Pershore. The circumstances of his death were related in a letter from Lieut. E. Millward, who writes :- ``He had not been long in my section, but had proved to be an efficient and cheerful worker, and one of our best telephonists. It may be some consolation to you to know he suffered no pain, being killed by a shell which dropped on our cook's fire. His best friend, Gunner Barker was killed, at the same time, and both are buried side by side in a cemetery close by. Our own padre took the service, all of us being present. The father, Mr Charles Marshall, was this week discharged from the army after 3.5 years service. Another son, Will, is serving in the front line


With acknowledgements and grateful thanks to Newsquest Evesham Journal 


Private Edward J Marshall


Service No 43693


Age 23


Lincolnshire Regiment – 10th Battalion


Formerly Service No 4660 of Worcestershire Regiment


Killed in action of 28th April 1917 at Flanders, France


Listed on Arras Memorial, France


Son of John & Rose Marshall of Newlands, Pershore


Evesham Journal 4 June 1917 - COUSINS KILLED. 


"A letter from a Pershore man, Lance-Corpl. John Gould, Royal Engineers, announced the death in a recent action of two cousins, Pte. James Annis, son of Mr. and Mrs. Annis, of Pensham, and Sapper Edward John Marshall, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Marshall, of the Newlands, Pershore, both of the Lincolns. The sad news has since been officially confirmed, and thus two more names are added to Pershore's Roll of Honour. Pte. Annis was 23 years of age, and his cousin 24. Both joined up under the group system, and were transferred from the Worcesters to the Lincolns. Both families have the sympathies of the Townspeople in their sad loss. In a letter to Mrs. Annis, the lieutenant of the company says her son was a good soldier, who did his duty fearlessly, faithfully, and well. Sapper Marshall's brother Philip, who was badly gassed in action last January, is now a substitute working on the land at Evesham.''


NB: This article from the Evesham Journal contains incorrect information as Edward and Philip are sons of John & Rose Marshall. As yet, I find no confirmation as to how they are related to James Samuel Annis. 


With acknowledgements and grateful thanks to Newsquest  Evesham Journal



An excerpt from The History of the Grimsby Chums (10th Battalion Lincolnshire Regt) details events on 28th April 1917 and can be viewed here.  This work is based on the Book "Grimsby's Own - the story of the Chums" by Peter Chapman. We are most grateful to Ian Jackson for allowing us to publish the relevant section here as below:

Lieutenant Kenneth Ralph Mason


4th Bn. Suffolk Regiment


Age 27


Killed in action on 21st June 1915 


Buried at St. Vaast Post Military Cemetery, Richebourg-L’avoue, Pas de Calais, France


Son of George and Loetitia Mason of Ispwich



Evesham Journal 29th July 1916 mentions that Lieut.

Kenneth Mason (killed in France) had been a member of the

Pershore Hockey Club.


Evesham Journal June 26 1915:-- PERSHORE LIEUTENANT KILLED. News was received in Pershore yesterday (Friday) morning that Lieut. Kenneth Mason had been killed in action. Lieut. Mason was formerly a pupil of Mr. E.P. Whiteley, and a year ago purchased from the exorss. of Mrs. the gardens at Gigbridge, Pershore


With acknowledgements and grateful thanks to Newsquest Evesham Journal 


Corporal Arthur MAYO

Service No 203377


Age: 31


2nd/7th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment


Killed in action on 3rd December 1917 at Flanders, France.


Buried in Fifteen Ravine British Cemetery, Villers-Plouich, France, IV. G. 10.


Born and enlisted Pershore. Was a Postman previously.


Went abroad 6th October 1916.


Appears on: Pershore Abbey, Worcester Post Office Wainwright Rd


Son of Mrs Ellen Mayo of High Street, Pershore

Evesham Journal 4th January 1918 - ``ANOTHER PERSHORE SOLDIER KILLED. One of the latest Pershore men who is reported to have made the great sacrifice is Corpl. Arthur Mayo (Jackie Mayo he was always called by his chums, and he had many who valued his friendship) Capt. Williams, who commands his company, in a letter of sympathy to Mrs. Mayo, who lives at the Old Turnpike House in Bridge-street, said the corporal was a most reliable soldier and an expert with the Lewis gun. He was with a few men on outpost duty when a shell exploded on the edge of his position, causing wounds from which he died shortly afterwards. The captain added that he would be much missed by the company. Corpl. Mayo was attached to the staff at Pershore Post Office, and three of his colleagues have been killed before him, while one is a prisoner of war. Corpl. Mayo was home on furlough a short time since, and met his death within a week of his return. He was good at most kinds of sports, and excelled in football.


With acknowledgements and grateful thanks to Newsquest Evesham Journal


Lieut. Col. John Francis James B Miller

Royal Engineers Indian Staff Corps.


Age: 72


H.M.'s 1st Battalion, 19th Regiment 1849-1863


Born approx. 1847 in Bombay. Died on 7th January 1917 of Pneumonia 


Worked as a recruiting Officer during the Great War.


Buried in Pershore Cemetery.


Husband of Mrs Grace Miller, lived at Amerie Court, Newlands.


Drawing (above) kindly supplied by Colonel Miller's Great-Granddaughter


Berrow’s Worcester Journal:

Death of Col. Miller – S. Worcestershire Recruiting Officer


Lieut-Colonel James Frederick Miller died at his residence in Amerie Court, Pershore on Sunday morning. He was aged 72. Exactly a week ago, he contracted a chill and pneumonia supervened. 


On December 20th 1916, he married at the Abbey Church Miss Grace Guest, daughter of Mr Thomas Guest of Pershore, who is attached to the Royal Engineers.


The death of Col. Miller is everywhere regarded with regret. He was the Recruiting Officer for the South Worcestershire Sub-Area and he performed his duties with efficiency, discretion and kindliness.


By his first wife, he leaves a daughter. Mrs J B Dowson of The Poplars, Bricklehampton, a lady who is extremely popular with all classes of society in the country and whose many acts of kindness are gratefully remembered in the households of the poor.

It is about 20 year since Colonel Miller and his daughter went to live in the Pershore District. For half that time they resided at The Cottage, Little Comberton. He was a keen follower of the Croome Hounds.


Col. Miller was a Staff Officer of the Indian Army and as an Engineer he did good work in the construction of roads and in connection with schemes of irrigation.


The funeral took place at the Cemetery on Wednesday afternoon and was of a semi-military character. The preliminary portion of the service was held at the Abbey Church which was crowded. Some hundreds of people were also gathered round the entrance gates and afterwards followed the cortège as it proceeded to the cemetery.


Signs of mourning were to be seen in all parts of the town, shutters being put up at most business places and blinds being drawn at private houses. The procession started from Amerie Court at 2.30. A firing party, in command of Lieut. E C Sadler, marched in front with arms reversed. Then came the hearse containing the coffin, around which was wrapped the Union Jack and on the top were placed the dead Colonel’s sword, belt and military cap. The Bearers were six non-commissioned officers (all Sergeants) from Norton Barracks.


The mourners were Mrs J B Dowson (daughter), Mrs Miller (widow), Mr J B Downson (son-in-law), Rev H Bourne (bother-in-law) Mr J W Dowson (Lower Hill) the Misses Dowson, Mr and Mrs T Guest, Master Harcourt Guest, Col C E Greenway (Head-Quarters Staff, Recruiting Area), Major Baker, Major Smith, Lieut. Neil Shelmerdine, Mr John Kent (Upton-Upon-Severn), Nurse Iremonger and Sergt. Major R Hook.


The coffin was met at the Lych Gate by the robed clergy and surplice choir and on either side of the Church Walk were drawn up the members of the Pershore, Elmley Castle and Cropthorne platoons of the Volunteer Training Crops under Commandant Rev H Clifford. Pending the arrival of the cortege and during the seating of the large congregation, Mr C Mason (the Abbey Organist) played Spohr’s “Blest are the departed” and Beethoven’s “Funeral March”. The commencement of a deeply impressive service was the hymn “Let saints on earth in concert sing”. The 90th Psalm was sung to Felton. The burial service was read by the Ven. H F Peile, Archdeacon of Warwick. The last hymn “Now the Labourer’s task is o’er”. Then followed the Nune Dimittis and the service ended with Chopin’s “Funeral March” on the organ.


Among the congregation were The Rev A H Phelps (Vicar of Pershore) and the Rev F R Lawson (Rector of Fladbury) officiating the Rev W H Wilkinson, the Rev Harcourt Fowler, the Rev W F Oakley, Dr Martin Woodward, Miss Woodward, Lieut. Col A Hudson, Mrs Hudson, Miss Hudson, Mrs Derrington Bell, Miss Hemming, Mrs Owen Wynn Marriott, Mr H Basil Harrison, Mr W Pearce, Mrs Winstanley, Mrs Clifford, Miss Clifford, Mr J S Bagnall, Capt. Derbyshire, Mr F Cope (Evesham District Military Tribunal), Mr A E Baker (Clerk to Pershore Tribunal), Mr and Mrs A W Smith, Misses Smith, Mr Charles Hunt, Mr A C Goddard, Mrs Goddard, Mr E T Grizzell, Mr D Workman, Mrs Caldwell, Mr J Billson, Will Friend (Head Huntsman of the Croome Hunt representing Mr R S Bagnall, Hon Secretary of the Hunt). 


Signs of mourning were to be seen in all parts of the town, shutters being put up at most business places and blinds being drawn at private houses. The procession started from Amerie Court at 2.30. A firing party, in command of Lieut. E C Sadler, marched in front with arms reversed. Then came the hearse containing the coffin, around which was wrapped the Union Jack and on the top were placed the dead Colonel’s sword, belt and military cap. The Bearers were six non-commissioned officers (all Sergeants) from Norton Barracks.


The mourners were Mrs J B Dowson (daughter), Mrs Miller (widow), Mr J B Downson (son-in-law), Rev H Bourne (bother-in-law) Mr J W Dowson (Lower Hill) the Misses Dowson, Mr and Mrs T Guest, Master Harcourt Guest, Col C E Greenway (Head-Quarters Staff, Recruiting Area), Major Baker, Major Smith, Lieut. Neil Shelmerdine, Mr John Kent (Upton-Upon-Severn), Nurse Iremonger and Sergt. Major R Hook.


The coffin was met at the Lych Gate by the robed clergy and surplice choir and on either side of the Church Walk were drawn up the members of the Pershore, Elmley Castle and Cropthorne platoons of the Volunteer Training Crops under Commandant Rev H Clifford. Pending the arrival of the cortege and during the seating of the large congregation, Mr C Mason (the Abbey Organist) played Spohr’s “Blest are the departed” and Beethoven’s “Funeral March”. The commencement of a deeply impressive service was the hymn “Let saints on earth in concert sing”. The 90th Psalm was sung to Felton. The burial service was read by the Ven. H F Peile, Archdeacon of Warwick. The last hymn “Now the Labourer’s task is o’er”. Then followed the Nune Dimittis and the service ended with Chopin’s “Funeral March” on the organ.


Among the congregation were The Rev A H Phelps (Vicar of Pershore) and the Rev F R Lawson (Rector of Fladbury) officiating the Rev W H Wilkinson, the Rev Harcourt Fowler, the Rev W F Oakley, Dr Martin Woodward, Miss Woodward, Lieut. Col A Hudson, Mrs Hudson, Miss Hudson, Mrs Derrington Bell, Miss Hemming, Mrs Owen Wynn Marriott, Mr H Basil Harrison, Mr W Pearce, Mrs Winstanley, Mrs Clifford, Miss Clifford, Mr J S Bagnall, Capt. Derbyshire, Mr F Cope (Evesham District Military Tribunal), Mr A E Baker (Clerk to Pershore Tribunal), Mr and Mrs A W Smith, Misses Smith, Mr Charles Hunt, Mr A C Goddard, Mrs Goddard, Mr E T Grizzell, Mr D Workman, Mrs Caldwell, Mr J Billson, Will Friend (Head Huntsman of the Croome Hunt representing Mr R S Bagnall, Hon Secretary of the Hunt).


With acknowledgements and grateful thanks to Newsquest Berrow's Journal.

Please note that the Berrow's Journal have Miller's name and age incorrect!  This information has been supplied by Lt. Col Miller's Great Granddaughter

Private Harold G Moseley

Service No 28688


Age: 19


Hampshire Regiment – 2nd Battalion


Died of wounds at Flanders, France on 5th September 1918.


Buried at Longueness (St Omer) Souvenir Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France


Son of Thomas & Lucy Moseley of Chipping Campden

Formerly of High Street in Pershore (1911 Census)


Evesham Journal, 21 September 1918:-- PERSHORE SOLDIER DIES OF WOUNDS. Deep sympathy is felt with Mr. and Mrs. T. Mosley and family, High-street, Pershore, in the loss of another son, Pte. Harold Moseley, of the Hampshire Regt., who is reported officially of having died of wounds received in action in France. He was 19 years of age. Previous to joining the colours in June 1917, he assisted his father in the boat trade. He went to France in the early part of April this year. His brother Leonard also died of wounds four months ago.


With acknowledgements and grateful thanks to Newsquest Evesham Journal


Private Leonard T Moseley

Service No 13181


Age: 22


Hampshire Regiment – 2nd Battalion


Died of wounds at Flanders, France on 6th May 1918 


Buried at Ebblinghem Military Cemetery, Nord, France


Son of Thomas & Lucy Moseley of Chipping Campden Formerly of High Street in Pershore (1911 Census)


Evesham Journal 25th May 1918 - PERSHORE SOLDIER KILLED


"Much sympathy is felt for Mr Thomas Moseley of High Street Pershore, an esteemed tradesman of Pershore and Mrs Moseley in the death of their second son Pte. Leonard Moseley, killed in action. At the outbreak of war, Leonard was one of the first to offer himself for the Army but was initially rejected. Determined, however, to enlist if possible, he underwent an operation and in September 1914 was accepted. He was transferred from the Worcesters and went with a Hampshire Regt to France in September 1915 and in December the same year proceeded to Salonika. He was invalided home in October 1916 with Dysentery and malaria and was in hospital several months before going to France again in August 1917. He had just recovered from Trench Fever when he met at the base his younger Brother Harold who had just arrived from England. Being devoted to his Brother, Leonard asked to give up his post as a head-quarter signaller to be with him and the request was granted. They went up the line and managed to keep together.  They had only been up the line four hours when Leonard was hit by a shell and died shortly afterwards on 6th May. He was 22 years of age. Percy, Mr Moseley's eldest son, was discharged from training in 1916. The late Leonard Moseley was formerly employed at the Atlas Works, Pershore and the Midland Station at Bath. 


With acknowledgements and grateful thanks to Newsquest Evesham Journal

Private Arthur MOULSON

Service No 86441


Age: 28


Sussex Yeomanry 50th Battalion Machine Corps


Died at Flanders, France on 1st November 1918 


Buried Niederzwehren Cemetery, Germany (POW buried here)


Son of Frank and Mary Moulson of Glenhurst,

Bridge St. Pershore


Evesham Journal, 21 September 1918:-- ANOTHER PERSHORE PRISONER.


 After several weeks of suspense, Mr. F.W. Moulson, sanitary inspector to the Rural District Council, has received a card from his youngest son Arthur, who is in a machine gun corps attached to a Northern Regiment, stating he was a prisoner in Germany. It is about ten months ago since Mr. and Mrs. Moulson received the news that their second son, Hiram, a fine lad, exceedingly popular in local sporting circles had been killed in Palestine. Their eldest son, James, is also in the army abroad.


 Evesham Journal, 28 December 1918:-- DEATH OF A PERSHORE PRISONER. 


The death of Pte. Arthur Moulson, at a hospital at Darmstadt, Germany, where he was a prisoner of war, makes the second son of Mr. and Mrs. F.W. Moulson, of Pershore, have lost in the war. Hiram, a corporal in the Sussex Yeomanry, was killed in action in Palestine just a year ago. James, the eldest son, in the Wireless Section of the Royal Engineers, is now in Belgium. The late Pte. Arthur Moulson, who was 28 years of age, was in the 50th Batt. of the Machine Gun Corps. He was taken prisoner on May 27 at Crayonne, on the Chemin des Dames. His first postcard from Germany reported ``sound and well'', but in a lter one from hospital he said his leg was getting better. Very little information came from him, and a fellow prisoner at the same camp, who has safely arrived at his home in the North of England, has written in reply to Mr. Moulson that Arthur at first was put to work behind the lines, and such men were never allowed to write letters home. The parents feel their bereavement acutely. They have in their sorrow th deep sympathy of the townspeople. A few years back Pte. Arthur Moulson worked for the firm of Messrs. Prothero and co. grocers, Pershore, which place he left to take to a business left him at Bradford by an aunt, and it was from here he joined the colours.


With acknowledgements and grateful thanks to Newsquest Evesham Journal


Corporal Hiram Wilfrid MOULSON

Service No 32027


Age: 30


16th (Sussex Yeomanry) Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment


Killed in action in Egypt aged 30 on 6th November 1917


Buried in Beersheba War Cemetery, Israel, Grave M. 34.


Commemorated Worcester Royal Grammar School

Pershore Abbey War Memorial


Son of Frank W. and Mary J. Moulson, 130 Paley Rd, Bradford

Native of Saltaire, Yorkshire


Hiram attended Worcester Royal Grammar School from 1900 to 1901. Whilst serving in Palestine under Allenby the Yeomanry regiments seized Beersheba on 31st October 1917, launching a further decisive attack which broke the defensive line of the Turks on 5th and 6th November. Hiram was killed in action at Tell esh Sheria on 6th November.

Source for additional information: In Dedication to a Future World By Mark Rogers, 1999.


Corporal Hiram Wilfred Moulson, Sussex Yeomanry, son of F.W. Moulson, Sanitary Inspector, Bridge Street, Pershore, September 1914, went to Gallipoli September 1915. At evacuation went to Egypt and was killed in Palestine 6th November 1917.


Evesham Journal 19 January 1918 - THE LATE CORPL. MOULSON. 


Mr. and Mrs. F.W. Moulson of Glenhurst, Bridge-street, Pershore, has received a letter from Lieut. A. Fletcher, relative to the death of their son, corporal Hiram Moulson who was killed, as already reported, during recent successful fighting in Palestine. The lieutenant writes ``Please accept my deepest sympathy for the loss you have sustained in the death of your son. We are just back from the fighting, having a little rest, and I am taking the first opportunity of writing. Capt. Kekewich, his company commander, was unfortunately killed in the same battle, but we have earned a name which can never die, so perhaps this may be a little comfort to you in your sorrow. Your son's death is a tremendous loss to us all. Both on and off parade he was always so cheerful, a quality which accounts for so much when campaigning. I have now to re-organise the company, and my task is a great one with so many of the best lads gone, but we must hope that it will all end soon, and that the lives of these brave men will not have been sacrificed in vain'' 


Evesham Journal 29 July 1916 says Hiram Moulson had been a member of Pershore Hockey Club. His photograph was printed in the Journal on the 8 December 1917 (though the caption gave his name as Corpl. D. Moulson)


With acknowledgements and grateful thanks to Newsquest Evesham Journal 


Private William MUMFORD

Service No 45123


Age: 35


4th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment


Born and resident Pershore, Worcestershire, enlisted in Worcester


Killed in action on 30th November 1917 at Flanders.


Commemorated on Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France,

Panel 6.


Son of Mrs Eliza Mumford of Head Street, Pershore

Private John NEED

Service No 17105


Age: 23


11th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment


Born Pershore, Worcestershire


Killed in action  at Salonika in the Balkans on 25th April 1917


Commemorated on Doiran Memorial, Greece.


Appears on: Worcester Cathedral Cloister Windows Bell Ringer,

Pershore Abbey


Son of Verger William and Hannah Need, of Engine Terrace,

Priest Lane, Pershore


Evesham Journal 16 June 1917 - `


`The Roll of Honour which is attached to the door of the old Abbey Church gets larger and larger, and now assumes considerable proportions. Mr. W. Need, the verger at the Abbey, knows the names on that Roll of Honour almost by heart, and now he has the sorrow of reading thereon the name of his own son, Sergt. Jack Need, of the Worcesters, who has fallen a victim to the bullets of the Bulgarians. Writing his mother only in April last Sergt. Need, who had then been wounded, said he had been up on the high mountains of Salonika for sixteen months, and was only carried down to go into hospital. He rejoined his company in their incessant vigil again in May, and the War Office now reports him as killed. Great sympathy is felt for the parents, who have two other sons in the service, their eldest Harry, Royal Engineers, and Tom, who has been two years in France, and has been wounded, only slightly fortunately, no less than five times. These three lads were valued choristers at the Abbey Church, where their father has been a faithful servant many years.''


Private Arthur Douglas NUTTING

Service No PLY/2325


Age: 20


2nd Royal Marine Battalion Royal Naval Division, Royal Marine Light Infantry


Killed in action on 6th April 1918


Enlisted on 6th July 1917 aged 20. An Engineer Shaper Embarked

Royal Marine Brigade on 24th August 1917

Draft for British Expeditionary Force on 6th November 1917,

joined 2nd Royal Marine Battalion on 21st November 1917


Commemorated on Pozieres Memorial, France, Panel 1.


Appears on: Drakes Broughton St Barnabas Church, Pershore War Memorial

Son of Charles & Elizabeth Nutting of Pershore Fields, Pershore


Evesham Journal May 4 1918 - ANOTHER PERSHORE MAN'S DEATH. Much sympathy is felt for Mr. Charles Nutting of Pershore Fields, who has received official information that his second son, Douglas, of the Royal Marine Light Infantry, was killed in action recently. He was, before the war, employed at the Atlas Works, and was very popular. Mr. Nutting's elder and only other son was one of the first Expeditionary Force, and he was taken a prisoner during the retreat from Mons, but is believed to have been one of the latest batch released in exchange and interned in Holland.


With acknowledgements and grateful thanks to Newsquest Evesham Journal 


Private Edward George PALFREY

Service No 12827


Age: 29


Grenadier Guards – 1st Battalion


Died of wounds at Flanders, France on 5th April 1918


Commemorated at Gezaincourt Communal Cemetery Extension


Son of Charles & Emily Palfrey of Binholme, Pershore


Berrows Journal, 14 November 1914:-- 

PERSHORE SOLDIER WOUNDED. THE BUTCHERY AMONG GERMANS.


Private E. Palfrey, a native of Pershore, is home invalided. He is a reservist in the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards. He was serving in the Metropolitan Police Force at the outbreak of war, and he was called to join his regiment. He went out with the first batch of the Expeditionary Force, and consequently saw a great deal of the fierce early fighting.

In giving a description of the engagements in which he took part prior to being wounded, he says: ``Mons was the place where I got my baptism of fire. For the first two or three hours I did not know where to look or what to think about the whole affair. After that I got hardened and accustomed to the circumstances. We fought our way up a hill, on the top of which were Germans. It was awful to see the dead and wounded roll down this hill after being shot. Bullets seemed to come about us like rain. In spite of this, our commander (under Col. Carry) came out top. Later we retired to Landrecies. From there we went back to within about four miles of Paris, which was the turning point of the war. None of us ever thought we should stop the Germans getting into Paris, but by real grit and determination we sent the beggars flying back. From there we advanced, and eventually got to the rivers. We entrenched there and held the position for five days. The trenches were filled with water up to our knees, but we had to stick it. We then made a couple of bayonet charges, but in spite of this we had to retire. Although we again peppered them, we lost about 200.


After this we advanced to Soissons on the 14th September, which day I got knocked over. The Major sent two others and me to try to find the position of the outposts of the Germans. In going off, we ran up against an officer of the Connaught Rangers, who said he had sent three patrols to locate the enemy, but neither had returned. This, of course, did not look very encouraging. We advanced to about 100 yards of the sky-line when we ran up against a patrol of Uhlans, who opened fire. We then advanced and opened fire on them. They retired and we got to the top of the hill and there saw about 5000 Germans advancing. We went back to the main body, and a reinforcement was sent for, as there was only about 180 of us to face them. We retired to a position to wait for them, and wait for reinforcements to arrive. We held on this position about two hours, and were eventually reinforced by two battalions. After about five hours hard fighting they put into operation the white flag business -- which our men do not now regard. When our men advanced to make them prisoners, they opened fire on us with their big guns, causing the remnants of what was left of us to retire. They kept up a rapid fire. It was here I got wounded and several of us lay between the two fires for nearly 56 hours, not daring to move for fear of being hit again. I kept fainting, and then rousing up only to faint again. Once, on waking up, I found a couple of dead Germans laying across me. I managed to extricate myself from them. While I lay there some of the Germans watched their opportunity to crawl out and took what bit of food I had upon me. Eventually we were picked up and placed in a farm shed, where we remained two days. The wounded Germans also were brought in with us. It was here that they told me how they abominated the idea of war, but were forced into it.


After two days the ambulance came along and we were taken away from the shed. The Germans were not removed until last, and after we were got some distance away, we saw smoke and flames issuing from the farm that we had just left. Then we learned that the Germans had shelled the farm, setting fire to it and thus burned alive their own wounded. The day before we reached Landrecies we saw an aeroplane flying over. We were ordered to lie low, so that he could not come down to try and find our positions. He came down to about 25 yards, when we were ordered to open rapid fire on him. We absolutely riddled the machine, and the airman and his mate came down with dozens of bullets in them'' After being wounded, Private Palfrey was eventually conveyed about 350 miles in cattle trucks down country, and put into the General Hospital for a week, after which he was sent to England. His three wounds were from a shrapnel shell, one piece of which entered his thigh, another entered his back, and another lodged under the shoulder. The last piece is still unremoved, but he is to undergo another operation in the near future.


With acknowledgements and grateful thanks to Newsquest Evesham Journal 



Lance Corporal Francis George PREECE D.C.M.

Service No 28667


Age: 32


Gloucestershire Regiment. 13th Service Battalion

Forest of Dean Pioneer


Died of wounds on 22nd March 1918  at Flanders, France


Enlisted at Chipping Campden (Was manager of Chipping Campden gasworks)


Commemorated at Pozieres Memorial, Somme, France


There is a memorial to him on William Rolls’ grave at Naunton Beauchamp


NB Pershore Abbey war memorial erroneously lists middle initial as “J”


Married Ada Rolls of Naunton Beauchamp on 6th February 1907


Evesham Journal 2 February 1918 - CHRISTMAS AT THE FRONT.


Corpl. F.G. Preece of the H.Q. Bombers, Glos. Regt. writing form ``Somewhere in Belgium'' on January 24 says:- ``I have had great pleasure of reading your paper out here in the front line trenches, and I can assure you it is a treat to get the `Evesham Journal' and see how things are going on at home. We had a very good time out here at Christmas. We happened to be out of the trenches, so we all settled down for a good time. We partook of all the usual Christmas pudding, beer, turkey, meat etc. On Boxing Day there was a Brigade Cross Country Race. The ground was covered with snow, and of course not being very far from the line the ground was very rough, but I managed to get through the lot. Nearly 200 started, I got home with ease, being presented with a medal and winning a silver bugle from my battalion. I used to do a good deal of running in peace time round Worcestershire and Essex. My father is manager of the Pershore Gas Works, and before joining the army I was manager at Chipping Campden Gas Works, so I thought some of my friends would like to hear of my win out here at Christmas. It is a great deal different to running in England. I am pleased to say all my mates in my battalion are all going strong. We have a jolly good colonel; he is very good to us, and we are willing to do anything for him, and all the other officers are very good. We have some very rough times, but we get through them all right. We don't mean to let the Germans have their own way. I for one should be glad to see it all over, especially after leaving a wife and five children, but I would sooner fight on than give in to the Germans. Everything is done to make us as comfortable as possible. We get well fed so we cannot grumble a lot.''


Evesham Journal 20 April 1918:- CAMPDEN GAS MANAGER KILLED. 


Official news has been received of the death of Lance-Corpl. F.G. Preece, D.C.M., of the Gloucestershire Regiment, on March 22. deceased joined the army June 1, 1916, and went out to France in December of the same year. He served as a bomber, and on February 22 of this year was awarded the D.C.M. for bravery on th field. Before joining the army, Lance-Corpl. Preece, who is the son of Mr. Preece, Manager of the Pershore Gas Works, was manager of the Campden Gas Works. He was 32 years of age, was of a genial disposition, and greatly liked by everyone with whom he came in contact. He leaves a wife and five young children. The following is a copy of the letter received from his commanding officer - "Dear Mrs. Preece. - I am sorry to have to inform you that your husband, No. 28667, Lance-Corpl. F.G. Preece, has died in hospital of wounds received in action. He was wounded by a shell, and succumbed a few days later, though we were able to send him off to hospital within half an hour of his being hit. He was a first-class soldier, and was liked and respected by all ranks. I am pleased to be able to forward you the official announcement of the award of the D.C.M. for his gallantry while serving with the - Gloucestershire Regt. Please accept our deep sympathy with you in your great loss." A memorial service was held at Naunton Beauchamp Church on Sunday by the Rector (the Rev. T. Davis) We shall give a photograph of the deceased soldier next week. (NB. this wasn't in the second edition, at least) 


Evesham Journal 4 May 1918:- HOW THE LATE LANCE-CORPL. F.G. PREECE WON THE D.C.M. 


In our issue of April 20 we reported that Lance-Corpl. F.G. Preece, of the Gloucester Regt., late gas manager at Campden, and son of Mr. Preece, manager of the Pershore Gas works, died in hospital on March 22 from wounds. Prior to his death, Lance-Corpl. Preece was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for gallantry, and the deed for which he was decorated is thus officially described in the "London Gazette" of Thursday:- When in charge of a party of bombers during araid, carrying some Bangalore torpedoes to cut the enemy wire, he joined the attacking party, and inserted a spare torpedo in a shelter full of the enemy and blew them up. His conduct was magnificent throughout."


With acknowledgements and grateful thanks to Newsquest Evesham Journa



Private Ernest PRICE

Service No 9649


Age: 41


Worcestershire Regiment 9th Battalion


Died of wounds in Mesopotamia on 21st January 1917 


Buried at Amara War Cemetery


Husband of Lizzie Price, Father of 9 of Head Street, Pershore


Evesham Journal 10th February 1917 – ANOTHER PERSHORE MAN KILLED


Mrs. Price, of Head-street, has received the official intimation that her husband, Pte. Ernest Price, of the Worcesters, has succumbed to wounds received in action in Mesopotamia. The widow, who is left with nine children, six of whom are dependent upon her, is deeply sympathised with in her distress. Pte. Price,, who was 41 years old, was one of those patriots who rushed to the colours in the early stages of the war. He went through the Gallipoli campaign, had been to Egypt and India, and had only recently gone out to Mesopotamia, His company officer was Lieut. Bert Hutton, of Pershore. It was the opinion of everyone who knew him that Pte. Price was a good type of soldier, strong, determined, and not too sensitive, and was probably as good and whole-hearted a fighter as he was an industrial worker at home. For 20 years he was with Messrs. Nicholas Bros., of Pershore, who speak of him as a good and reliable servant.''


 Evesham Journal, 28 April 1917, extract of an article titled `Pershore Officers':


``A letter from Mesopotamia from Pte. Will Cowley of the Worcesters, to his former employer, Mr. Frank Nicholas, tells how Pte. Ernest Price met his death. `He was shot by a sniper in broad daylight.' `Poor old Ern,' says the writer, `I do miss him terribly. we were always chums. We enlisted together, came out here together, and only said to each other we hoped we should come home together.' The letter goes on to refer to the `smashing up' the Turks are getting.''


With acknowledgements and grateful thanks to Newsquest Evesham Journal 

Private William Henry PRING

Service No 20558


Age: 31


Worcestershire Regiment 9th Battalion


Killed in action on 25th February 1917 at Mesopotamia


Listed on Basra Memorial, Iraq


Husband of Ellen Pring nee Cottrill of Head Street, Pershore

Private Hubert Clendon PUGH

Service No 203840


Age: 30


Worcestershire Regiment 1.7th Battalion


Killed in action in Italy on 15th June 1918


Buried Magna Boschi British Cemetery in Italy.


Memorial on Brother Thomas’ gravestone in Pershore Cemetery.


Son of Alfred & Jane Pugh of Head Street, Pershore


Evesham Journal 31 August 1918:-- PERSHORE SOLDIER KILLED.


Much sympathy is felt for Mr. Alfred Pugh, of Head-Street, who has received information that the second of his soldier sons has fallen in the war. Tom died in a London Hospital last year, and was brought home for burial, and Hubert, of the Worcesters, has been killed in Italy The officer, whose sergeant he was, lost his life in the same action. The commanding Officer, in a sympathetic letter to the father says:- ``It was the fine spirit in which your son and his comrades followed their officers and non-commissioned officers which led to the success of the engagement. I, as his commanding officer, can say I have lost a brave man'' A kindly-written letter from the Chaplain says:- ``Hubert died gallantly in a noble cause, and his body lies buried in the military cemetery on the Asiago Plateau, the grave being marked. Before joining up, Pte. Pugh was gardener to Mr. H. Basil Harrison, of Manor House, whose tribute one of which the father may well feel proud, Hubert Pugh had many friends in the town who deeply mourn his loss.


With acknowledgements and grateful thanks to Newsquest Evesham Journal


SapperThomas Pugh

Service No 165006


Age: 33


Gloucestershire Regiment


Died on 17th March 1917 at Willesden Hospital, London


Buried in Pershore Cemetery

                                                                

Son of Alfred & Jane Pugh of Church Row, Pershore


Evesham Journal 21 March 1917 :-- ``PERSHORE SOLDIER'S DEATH.


Great sympathy is felt for Mrs. Pugh, of High-Street, Pershore, in the death of her husband, Sapper Thomas Pugh, of the Royal Engineers, which occurred at Willesden Hospital, London on Saturday. Deceased, who was 33 years of age, was the third son of Mr. Alfred Pugh, of the Newlands, and was worthy of the esteem in which he was generally regarded as that of a straightforward, manly young fellow. He was a good footballer, and filled the position as right back in the local team for many years. He was also, as may not be generally known, quite skilled in the art of gymnastics. he was a bricklayer by trade, and before joining the Royal Engineers in May last year worked for Messrs. Nicholas Bros., and also other local firms. His brother Hubert (the youngest son of Mr. A. Pugh) is now lying wounded in the General Hospital at Edgbaston. Mrs. T. Pugh is left with two young children. Her husband came scathe-less through several engagements, but the rigours of trench warfare gave him pneumonia, which was the ultimate cause of his death. Mrs. Pugh was in the hospital when he passed away. His body was brought to Pershore on Wednesday, and was taken to the home for the night. On Thursday, the Vicar (the Re. A. H. Philips conducted the burial service at the cemetery. The mourners were Mrs. T. Pugh (widow) Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Pugh (father and mother), Messrs. Fred Pugh and Arthur Pugh (brothers), Sapper T. Cornelius (Royal Engineers, brother-in-law) Floral tributes were sent by all members of the family, also Mr. and Mrs. G. Summers (a former employer), Mr. and Mrs. W. Winwood, Mr. and Mrs. Joynes, Mr. and Mrs. T. Cornelius, etc.


With acknowledgements and grateful thanks to Newsquest Evesham Journal

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